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FRIM / Forest Research Institute Malaysia - Places to Visit in Kuala Lumpur
Destinations and Sights - Outskirts of Kuala Lumpur



Forest Research Institute Malaysia or FRIM is the nearest nature destination for visitors who wish to see and experience the wonders of a tropical forest without the rigors of travelling to the national parks. It offers all walks of life a back-to-nature experience whilst enjoying the flora, fauna. There are jungle trails, canopy walkway, waterfalls, a herbarium, a library and a museum housing different species of wood, their uses and products.

Founded by British colonial forest scientist in 1929, FRIM is one of the leading institutions in tropical forestry research. Surrounded by the Bukit Lagong Forest Reserve, it covers 600 hectares of experimental plants, arboretum and reforested areas.

The grounds, which began as degraded land in the form of sterile mining pools, scrubby wasteland and barren vegetable farms, long-abandoned, is today a treasure of reforestation that allows visitors to see a tropical rainforest ecosystem. Visitors even have an opportunity, nerve allowing, walking through the “high rise” of the forest canopy on a special overhead walkway



Numerous trees and shrubs have been planted in the grounds. Many of them are rare and not easily found elsewhere. There are numerous self-guiding nature trails through different sections of the plantations.

Many a visitors' curiosity is aroused by persistent calls from unseen creatures in impenetrable thickets: or the melodies songs of innumerable birds, the hoarse vocalization of the forest gecko, the strident symphony of cicadas, the scream of an eagle perched regally on the topmost branch of an emergent tree, the symphonic sounds of frogs and toads in the forest. Forests have smells that may delight or offend. A subtle perfume may drift around the mighty buttresses of a giant tree issuing from unseen flowering canopies high above the ground. Sometimes an offensive odour emanates from a moonrat alarmed in his lair or from the fruits of a Kulim(Garlic Tree) scattered on the ground.


The full and sometimes bewildering complexity of a tropical rain forest unfolds in differing ways to different visitors. Some may chance upon a wild animal as it dashes off through the undergrowth, or stares down momentarily from the safety of a lofty branch. Others may be fascinated by the blending of an insect into the hues and texture of a leaf or bark. Another may pause to watch the column of black termites moving over branch, twig, rock or root, a column without beginning or end, just movement without apparent purpose. Many take note of the ever present bird life be it a Malkoha sulking through the branches or an eagle winging high above the canopy.


Leaf InsectThe plant world, through immobile, has its own fascinating features, from the unexpected coloured flushes of young leaves, to the sinuous draping of innumerable vines sometimes spiralling and twisting in thin air to accommodate a tree now no longer in existence. Mushroom and fungi can appear in an incredible range of colours and shapes from immaculate white, delicate pinks and yellows to dark browns and black; from robust and solid boughs, to translucent little umbrellas, solitary among the forest litter.




Canopy walkway
This walkway system spans about 200 m and suspended between trees about 30 m above ground, is the third of its kind in Malaysia. The walkway system and the platforms are vantage points from which one experiences a panoramic view of the forest. Beside this, the walkway system functions as a platform for scientific study of canopy plants and animals. Those interested in experiencing the canopy walk should preferably make prior arrangement because the number of people allowed on the canopy walk per day is limited to 250 people.


Located in kepong, 16km northwest of Kuala Lumpur
Dress casually and bring along rain gear on wet days. Please wear sports or rubber shoes.


Best way to visit -
FRIM RAINFOREST PARK / ABORIGINE MUSEUM TOUR
This private tour starts with a morning tour to visit FRIM, where you will proceed on a trail with a nature guide to show you the interesting aspects of the tropical rainforest, the trees, birds and the insect life. This can be quite a strenuous hike as the trail will be winding and uphill. You will then take the canopy walkway to experiences a panoramic view of the forest and the surrounding areas. On your return journey, you can do a stop brief visit to the aboriginal museum. Among the displays are weapons used for hunting, clothing made from tree barks, traditional musical instruments, etc.

The Orang Asli are the aboriginal people of Peninsular Malaysia, with an estimated population of over 60,000. They still lead a simple yet fascinating lifestyle. Their ancient customs and traditions are informatively displayed in this museum.



Best Way to Visit - FRIM Rainforest Tour


DESTINATION & SIGHTS ~ ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE CITY
Batu Caves / Selangor Pewter / Sunway Lagoon / Templer Park / FRIM / Putrajaya

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